A Conversation With Jacques Leveillé-Nizerolle – Part 1

A while ago I wrote an article titled “Dassault Systemes Gets Into Embedded Systems” wherein I explained (to the extent that I could understand) what the company’s so called “Systems Strategy” was. I wanted to know more about what Dassault Systemes was doing in the embedded systems sphere. So I asked the company to put me in touch with the right person, which is exactly what they did. I just got off the phone with Jacques Leveillé-Nizerolle, the CEO of the CATIA brand. Dassault Systemes is such a large entity that they have CEO’s for each of their brands, Jeff Ray being the CEO of SolidWorks. Jacques and I wandered about the place and spoke on stuff other than the Systems Strategy including CATIA on the Cloud. I am going to split the conversation into parts. This is the first installment.

Deelip: When Bernand Charles spoke about embedded systems at SolidWorks World 2010 I didn’t quite understand what he meant. Your recent acquisition of Geensoft raised my curiosity about the subject. Can you explain to me what the “Systems Strategy” of Dassault Systemes is all about?

Jacques: Sure. Actually this is something that has its roots with the way the products of our customers have evolved over the past 10 years or so. For example, 10 years ago you actually drove your car. Now you maybe still at the wheel, but a computer does about 50% of the work for you. It helps you stay out of trouble and gives you better performance. Cars have evolved a great deal. They have far more electronics than before. In fact if you have 100 people working on the design of a power train you have an equal number of people working on the Systems Engineering of that power train.

Our customers have got their CAD and PLM parts of their businesses optimized using our solutions. But most of their problems originate from the fact that a digital mock-up, basically a 3D CAD model, gives no information about how the objects behave with relation to the embedded systems being engineered alongside them. The problem is that CAD and Systems Engineering are two very separate fields and the solutions for each are separate as well. We were asked to develop the next generation of solutions which had the framework of representing and simulating a product completely – not just a 3D CAD model but also with its Systems Engineering embedded with it.

Systems Engineering is a very large domain. Recently I spoke to one of our customers who showed me his Systems Engineering environment made of 120 different non integrated software solutions. This is a nightmare for him. He needs a single unified environment for Systems Engineering, similar to what we have achieved in CAD, and he needs it fully integrated in PLM.

Part 2 >>

  • Dave Ault

    “For example, 10 years ago you actually drove your car. Now you maybe still at the wheel, but a computer does about 50% of the work for you.”

    I have yet to see any production car do this. What I am seeing however is wilder and more improbable comparisons all the time by advocates of the cloud as they attempt to obfuscate reality in their efforts to forcibly sell something to customers that don't want it. I am to the point where if a software vendor starts extolling the value of the cloud to me as a selling point for their product I know I am in the wrong place. They can't deliver what they promise period and are carefull not to put their money where their mouth is with proven examples and technology. I would love to see these self exonerating EULAS they will demand you sign for this marvel of streamlined computing efficiency proving their confidence in what they are going to sell you. They can't say this is not true with out showing us proof otherwise. I want these guys to quit showing the icing on the cake without showing the cake to. Show me a whole slice!

    This is one cad user whose company will not adopt this and I will leave any software company that says I have to and replace it with software that lets me control my own destiny. I am not going to get involved in a business model that says I will give up my autonomy and right to choose where and how I spend my money to some entity that hopes to trick me into a situation I can never leave. It is all about how they will lock you into their software even tighter than legacy files and the cost of deploying new software does now. You adopt this model that Dassault is going to deploy to prevent you from going anywhere else and you will get what you deserve. Lets cut through the flowery words and get right down to the truth of it all. It is about your money in their pockets with no recourse. Prove me wrong Dassault.

  • http://www.deelip.com Deelip Menezes

    Dave,

    I totally get where you are coming from. Just wanted to make a point about the car example that Jacques was talking about.

    My first car had a carburetor. When I floored the pedal, air-fuel mixture entered and was ignited by a spark. Today that does not happen. Some computer takes readings from a million sensors and decides exactly how much air-fuel mixture should be combusted. If I wanted to start the AC I pushed a button. Today I set a temperature and the car does its own thing. Even braking is not done by me completely. Some computer tells the anti-skid braking system how it should or should not work. Today cars even apply brakes on their own if they sense that there will be a collision.

    I completely agree with Jacques. I think his 50% figure is low actually.

  • Dave Ault

    Yes I figured that was the point he was trying to make. But all of this stuff pales into insignificance compared to the amount of raw data processed by the organic computer [ call it a workstation if you will ] sitting behind the wheel while driving and none of these other things he references happen until the organic computer initiates the action. I am certain that the amount of unpredictable behavior processed by the organic computer to turn a corner in high traffic situations involves far more than pre modeled sparks or brakes . Furthemore it is all controlled by a closed loop system autonomous to the vehicle and dependent on nothing else to work. The idea that this compares with the cloud model they wish to sell is just another silly arguement no matter how they spin it it.

  • http://www.deelip.com Deelip Menezes

    Dave: “The idea that this compares with the cloud model they wish to sell is just another silly arguement no matter how they spin it it.”

    I think you mixing two very different issues here. The car example was meant to explain the work Dassault Systemes is doing with embedded systems and has absolutely nothing to do with the Cloud.

  • Dave Ault

    Looking at page 3 of your interview is what got me going and there is a lot about the inevitable arrival of the cloud for Dassault products there including I would assume the software brands they are buying. It seems to me that everything they are doing is geared towards integration with this model they are gambling on. So yes part of this article is on embeded systems and the rest is how Dassault is going to stick all on the cloud. How else am I to interpret a statement like “This is a nightmare for him. He needs a single unified environment for Systems Engineering, similar to what we have achieved in CAD, and he needs it fully integrated in PLM” from page one as anything other than Dassaults effort to put embedded systems developement and inplementation into their cloud paradigm. It is just another hook they want the fish to bite on and at least to me the thrust of all his comments in aggregate were basically that we are going to offer this on the cloud to, don't you want to be here with us?

    The amount of tech in a car is however an interesting aside to his main purpose.




Archives

© 2014 Deelip.com. All Rights Reserved. Deelip.com is a registered trademark of Deelip Menezes. Log in - Designed by Gabfire Themes