What Exactly Is Creo? – Part 5

<< Part 4

I have been receiving quite a few comments on this “What Exactly Is Creo?” series. Here is one that I found interesting. Jburril wrote:

OK, so PTC’s vision is to have a modular line-up with a common file format. This is the thing that’s going to change MCAD and drive it for the next twenty years. Give me a break. Wake me up when deflection under load is a design parameter and not an analysis result.

For me the key breakthrough (if any) will be in the way Creo does direct modeling. If Creo’s direct modeling is simply automating the hack and whack approach now being used by history based parametric modeling users, then I would hardly consider that as a breakthrough. It will be a time saver, that’s all. Autodesk is trying to achieve something unprecedented by making the software so intelligent that it can pick apart the history tree and incorporate the direct modeling changes made to it, all the time. From the limited understanding that I have on Creo (because I don’t have the software yet) I gather that the software can edit the feature tree if the direct modeling changes made are simple. But if they are complicated, Creo Elements/Direct simply adds a move face feature to the feature tree (which is invisible to the user) which then shows up in the Creo Elements/Pro. If that is indeed the case, then this whole thing is simply reduced to mere automation of an existing task.

Bottom line, the problem with history based parametric modeling is not the feature tree. It’s the history based nature of the feature tree. If Creo is going to “solve” the problem by simply automating the existing unacceptable solution, then I’m really not interested in it from the technology point of view. And I don’t think that is what the industry wants to do for the next 20 years. The industry needs a game changer, not a time saver. Again, I need to use the software before I can comment on it with some level of authority. It’s all up in the air now.

Part 6 >>

  • http://wertel.eng.pro Scott Wertel

    I’m in a similar perspective, based on limited information, as Jburril. In one of my tweets during the presentation I asked about MathCAD Prime. I haven’t heard anything about this change to MathCad nor if it is included in the suite of applications for CREO. When is the actual engineering knowledge going to be included in the design? Like Jburril says, I want real-world design parameters as part of the design, not just an analysis result.

    Give me a 20 foot long bar that can hold a cantilevered load of 1000 lbs made of standard structural steel extrusion (shapes) with a deflection no greater than .25 inch. No sketching, no extruding. Input a few engineering parameters and my design has shape.

  • http://wertel.eng.pro Scott Wertel

    I’m in a similar perspective, based on limited information, as Jburril. In one of my tweets during the presentation I asked about MathCAD Prime. I haven’t heard anything about this change to MathCad nor if it is included in the suite of applications for CREO. When is the actual engineering knowledge going to be included in the design? Like Jburril says, I want real-world design parameters as part of the design, not just an analysis result.

    Give me a 20 foot long bar that can hold a cantilevered load of 1000 lbs made of standard structural steel extrusion (shapes) with a deflection no greater than .25 inch. No sketching, no extruding. Input a few engineering parameters and my design has shape.

  • http://wertel.eng.pro Scott Wertel

    I’m in a similar perspective, based on limited information, as Jburril. In one of my tweets during the presentation I asked about MathCAD Prime. I haven’t heard anything about this change to MathCad nor if it is included in the suite of applications for CREO. When is the actual engineering knowledge going to be included in the design? Like Jburril says, I want real-world design parameters as part of the design, not just an analysis result.

    Give me a 20 foot long bar that can hold a cantilevered load of 1000 lbs made of standard structural steel extrusion (shapes) with a deflection no greater than .25 inch. No sketching, no extruding. Input a few engineering parameters and my design has shape.

  • http://wertel.eng.pro Scott Wertel

    I’m in a similar perspective, based on limited information, as Jburril. In one of my tweets during the presentation I asked about MathCAD Prime. I haven’t heard anything about this change to MathCad nor if it is included in the suite of applications for CREO. When is the actual engineering knowledge going to be included in the design? Like Jburril says, I want real-world design parameters as part of the design, not just an analysis result.

    Give me a 20 foot long bar that can hold a cantilevered load of 1000 lbs made of standard structural steel extrusion (shapes) with a deflection no greater than .25 inch. No sketching, no extruding. Input a few engineering parameters and my design has shape.

  • http://wertel.eng.pro Scott Wertel

    I’m in a similar perspective, based on limited information, as Jburril. In one of my tweets during the presentation I asked about MathCAD Prime. I haven’t heard anything about this change to MathCad nor if it is included in the suite of applications for CREO. When is the actual engineering knowledge going to be included in the design? Like Jburril says, I want real-world design parameters as part of the design, not just an analysis result.

    Give me a 20 foot long bar that can hold a cantilevered load of 1000 lbs made of standard structural steel extrusion (shapes) with a deflection no greater than .25 inch. No sketching, no extruding. Input a few engineering parameters and my design has shape.

  • http://wertel.eng.pro Scott Wertel

    I’m in a similar perspective, based on limited information, as Jburril. In one of my tweets during the presentation I asked about MathCAD Prime. I haven’t heard anything about this change to MathCad nor if it is included in the suite of applications for CREO. When is the actual engineering knowledge going to be included in the design? Like Jburril says, I want real-world design parameters as part of the design, not just an analysis result.

    Give me a 20 foot long bar that can hold a cantilevered load of 1000 lbs made of standard structural steel extrusion (shapes) with a deflection no greater than .25 inch. No sketching, no extruding. Input a few engineering parameters and my design has shape.

  • http://www.deelip.com Deelip Menezes

    No, its only Pro/ENGINEER, CoCreate and ProductView. I asked Mike Campbell why ArborText was not included since its output goes hand in hand with the product’s models and documents. He replied that Creo was meant for design people only. Maybe they will add other brands at a later date, who knows?

  • Neil

    Does anyone else think ‘Creo’ is a dreadful name?….

  • Murray

    I think it’s evocative of “creole”. What was creole? A culture and language that evolved more or less spontaneously when colonial interests congregated diverse other cultures and languages together. Multiculturalism that doesn’t impinge on anyone’s individual cultural territory, but includes it in an agglomerate. It’s a big ambition, and does PTC see itself as a paternalistic colonial empire? There’s probably enough difference in the name for PTC to declaim that it’s coincidence, or that abbreviating “create” to “crea” isn’t so euphonic.

  • Murray

    Jburril has just added his voice to the call for the “draw-my-whatever” tool. If the software is the designer or engineer, you’re not the designer or engineer. If the possibility existed for a corporation to utilise software to do the work of the designer or engineer, they’d have data entry clerks doing your job right now. What do designers and engineers bring to a job? Creativity, innovation, lateral thought and infinite variety. Computers can be programmed to emulate some of those things, but it takes an engineer to program the computer.

  • Neil

    I thought of that. I think it is a term for a type of ethnic cooking in parts of the US too?? -not sure I am not from there , but also I remembered ‘creosote’.

    from dictionary – an oily liquid having a burning taste and a penetrating odor, obtained by the distillation of coal and wood tar, used mainly as a preservative for wood and as an antiseptic.

    A long time ago now we used to use this on my grandfathers shed to preserve the rough sawn timber. It came in tins and was like dirty diesel. It was horrible stuff also not very effective against bugs and a fire hazard I think. We stopped using it…

  • Murray

    Creosote turned out to be carcinogenic! The US creole culture in Louisiana and Mississippi originated in the Caribbean, in the cultural mix of European colonisation and African slavery. Linguists say that the kids evolved the language because they didn’t speak a common one, and a similar creole language evolved in Indonesia, independently.

  • Neil

    Yeah I know, it hasnt been available here for years. I’m going back 35-40 years to when I helped apply it to the shed.
    It just came to mind with ‘Creo’. Still think its a dreadful name for a CAD program….

  • J Paul Grayson

    The name makes me think of Oreo, the cookie, but maybe it is just my reading glasses. Got Milk!

  • Bin

    how does creo compare with Siemens PLM Solid Edge ST3?

  • http://www.deelip.com Deelip Menezes

    I don’t know. I don’t have access to Creo yet.

  • Smartin

    I think it’s more likely chosen for its Latin meaning: “to create”.

  • Ggabbott

    not for cajun food…..

  • Pingback: Direct Modeling In Creo | Deelip.com

  • Query

    How does Creo compare to Autocad 2D




Archives

© 2014 Deelip.com. All Rights Reserved. Deelip.com is a registered trademark of Deelip Menezes. Log in - Designed by Gabfire Themes